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Massachusetts, Eastern Essex

Public Information Statement

Statement as of 6:37 PM EDT on July 20, 2017

Expires 10:30 AM EDT on July 21, 2017


... Hurricane preparedness week in southern New England...
... Rules of thumb for southern New England hurricanes - part 4...

The National Weather Service has declared this week as hurricane
preparedness week in southern New England. The following is the
fourth in a series of five statements.

Another rule of thumb for New England hurricanes is to know that
the most significant threat from hurricanes is flooding, either
due to coastal inundation or heavy rainfall. In both cases, it
is best to leave areas prone to flooding and seek shelter in
structures which can withstand the wind. This is also a good idea
for those in areas which may not flood themselves, but become
isolated asall access points into that area are closed.

Along a coastline, the main threat is the storm surge. The storm
surge is simply water from the ocean pushed toward shore by the
wind. Besides the intensity and speed of a tropical system, the
arrival time and slope of the ocean bottom play a large role in
determining the severity of a storm surge. A storm surge arriving
during the peak of a high tide will be different than the same
storm surge arriving during a low tide. Areas with a steep
coastline will not experience as much storm surge as areas with a
more shallow coast.

Beginning with the 2017 hurricane season, the National Weather
Service will issue storm surge watches and warnings to highlight
areas along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of the Continental
United States that have significant risk of life-threatening
inundation from a tropical cylone, subtropical cyclone,
Post tropical cyclone, or a potenital tropical cyclone. Storm
surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a
tropical cyclone, and it doesn't always occur at the same times
or locations as a storm's hazardous winds. In addition, while in
most cases coastsal residents can remain in their homes (or in a
secure structure nearby) and be safe from a tropical cyclone's
winds,
evacuations are generally needed to keep people safe from storm
surge.
Having separate warnings for these two hazards will save lives by
better identifying the specific tropical cyclone hazards
communities
face, and by enhancing public response to instructions from local
officials.

The storm surge watch/warning areas are determined by a
collaborative
process between the National Hurricane Center and local NWS
weather
forecast offices.

Issued for the danger of life-threatening inundation from rising
water
moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified
area,
generally within 36 hours, in association with an ongoing or
potential
tropical cyclone, a subtropical cyclone, or a Post-tropical
cyclone. The
warning may be issued earlier when other conditions, such as the
onset
of tropical storm-force winds, are expected to limit the time
available
to take protective actions for surge (e.G., Evacuations). The
warning may
also issued for locations not expected to receive life-
threatening
inundation, but which could potentially be isolated by inundation
in
adjacent areas.

For more information on the new storm surge watches and warnings
please
visit www.NHC.NOAA.Gov



For the latest updates... please visit our webpage at
www.Weather.Gov/Boston

You can follow US on facebook at
www.Facebook.Com/nwsboston

637 PM EDT Thu Jul 20 2017

... Hurricane preparedness week in southern New England...
... Rules of thumb for southern New England hurricanes - part 4...

The National Weather Service has declared this week as hurricane
preparedness week in southern New England. The following is the
fourth in a series of five statements.

Another rule of thumb for New England hurricanes is to know that
the most significant threat from hurricanes is flooding, either
due to coastal inundation or heavy rainfall. In both cases, it
is best to leave areas prone to flooding and seek shelter in
structures which can withstand the wind. This is also a good idea
for those in areas which may not flood themselves, but become
isolated asall access points into that area are closed.

Along a coastline, the main threat is the storm surge. The storm
surge is simply water from the ocean pushed toward shore by the
wind. Besides the intensity and speed of a tropical system, the
arrival time and slope of the ocean bottom play a large role in
determining the severity of a storm surge. A storm surge arriving
during the peak of a high tide will be different than the same
storm surge arriving during a low tide. Areas with a steep
coastline will not experience as much storm surge as areas with a
more shallow coast.

Beginning with the 2017 hurricane season, the National Weather
Service will issue storm surge watches and warnings to highlight
areas along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of the Continental
United States that have significant risk of life-threatening
inundation from a tropical cylone, subtropical cyclone,
Post tropical cyclone, or a potenital tropical cyclone. Storm
surge is often the greatest threat to life and property from a
tropical cyclone, and it doesn't always occur at the same times
or locations as a storm's hazardous winds. In addition, while in
most cases coastsal residents can remain in their homes (or in a
secure structure nearby) and be safe from a tropical cyclone's
winds,
evacuations are generally needed to keep people safe from storm
surge.
Having separate warnings for these two hazards will save lives by
better identifying the specific tropical cyclone hazards
communities
face, and by enhancing public response to instructions from local
officials.

The storm surge watch/warning areas are determined by a
collaborative
process between the National Hurricane Center and local NWS
weather
forecast offices.

Issued for the danger of life-threatening inundation from rising
water
moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified
area,
generally within 36 hours, in association with an ongoing or
potential
tropical cyclone, a subtropical cyclone, or a Post-tropical
cyclone. The
warning may be issued earlier when other conditions, such as the
onset
of tropical storm-force winds, are expected to limit the time
available
to take protective actions for surge (e.G., Evacuations). The
warning may
also issued for locations not expected to receive life-
threatening
inundation, but which could potentially be isolated by inundation
in
adjacent areas.

For more information on the new storm surge watches and warnings
please
visit www.NHC.NOAA.Gov



For the latest updates... please visit our webpage at
www.Weather.Gov/Boston

You can follow US on facebook at

Weather Severe Map
Alabama - Heat Advisory
Alaska - Areal Flood Advisory , Special Statement
Arizona - Areal Flood Advisory , Special Statement , Record Report
Arkansas - Heat Advisory
California - Areal Flood Advisory , Excessive Heat Watch , Air Quality Alert , Beach Hazard Statement
Colorado - Flash Flood Watch , Public Information Statement , Public Information Statement
Connecticut - Public Information Statement
Delaware - Excessive Heat Warning
District of Columbia - Heat Advisory , Air Quality Alert
Florida -
Georgia - Air Quality Alert
Hawaii - High Surf Advisory , Special Statement , Record Report
Idaho - Severe Thunderstorm Warning
Illinois - Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch, Flood Advisory , Flash Flood Watch , Flood Advisory, Flash Flood Watch , Heat Advisory , Excessive Heat Warning
Indiana - Flood Warning , Heat Advisory
Iowa - Flash Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch , Excessive Heat Warning , Heat Advisory , Special Statement , Record Report
Kansas - Heat Advisory , Excessive Heat Warning , Public Information Statement
Kentucky - Heat Advisory , Special Statement
Louisiana - Heat Advisory
Maine - Beach Hazard Statement
Maryland - Heat Advisory , Air Quality Alert
Massachusetts - Dense Fog Advisory , Public Information Statement
Michigan - Air Quality Alert
Minnesota - Flash Flood Watch , Heat Advisory
Mississippi - Heat Advisory
Missouri - Excessive Heat Warning , Heat Advisory , Public Information Statement
Montana - Lake Wind Advisory , Fire Weather Warning
Nebraska - Excessive Heat Warning , Heat Advisory , Record Report , Public Information Statement
Nevada - Areal Flood Advisory
New Jersey - Excessive Heat Warning , Heat Advisory , Air Quality Alert
New Mexico - Areal Flood Advisory
New York - Heat Advisory , Public Information Statement , Public Information Statement
North Carolina - Heat Advisory , Air Quality Alert , Beach Hazard Statement
Ohio - Heat Advisory
Oklahoma - Heat Advisory
Pennsylvania - Excessive Heat Warning
Rhode Island - Public Information Statement
South Dakota - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Severe Thunderstorm Warning , Heat Advisory , Special Statement
Tennessee - Heat Advisory , Special Statement , Air Quality Alert , Public Information Statement
Texas - Flood Warning , Heat Advisory
Utah - Flash Flood Watch , Public Information Statement
Virginia - Heat Advisory , Air Quality Alert
West Virginia - Heat Advisory
Wisconsin - Flood Warning, Areal Flood Warning , Flood Warning , Areal Flood Warning , Flash Flood Watch , Special Statement
Wyoming - Special Statement

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